Automatic Aid, Mutual Aid, and Consolidation Nothing New

Nothing pisses me off more than ego trips that could potential kill firefighters, and Civilians. I have been reading lately about Fire Service Administrators ( Not Leaders ) there is a significant difference that like to play the ignorance card when it comes to putting the best foot forward when it comes to providing emergency service to the public. It is not a secret and it is not frowned upon to use any of the three componets listed in our title. I can hear the older firefighters now we had firefighters back in our day. We fought fire with four guys and we got it done. Well hats off to you sir and glad you made it this far, but this is not your old fires. I will not bore you with the rambling of how many people it effectively takes to get the job done and still save a little something for the next alarm, but I will say to every Administrator ( City Mangers, Chiefs, and other politicans ) I do hope that the public starts to sue the hell out of you for your ignorance. In fact if a firefighter or civilian dies I hope you get jail time for your neglect. Ignorance is not an acceptable excuse. Firefighters it is time to stand up for yourselves and stop allowing your lives to be put in jeporadry for someones ego. All of the above are not new ideas and its about damn time someone else brings the subject to light.

2 Comments

  • Scott says:

    If there were a “like” button on here, I would like the shit outta this. Absolutely true

  • I’m glad to see a brother pushing use of automatic and mutual aid. If a department is unable to muster sufficient resources, the trucks, staff, and tools must come from somewhere else. There are two things I’d like to add about using automatic and mutual aid.

    First, there’s more to an automatic or mutual aid agreement than just stating the types of equipment and staffing resources your department will be receiving and/or providing. Don’t forget to add requirements for all participating departments to conduct a certain number of annual training sessions together. These training sessions are very valuable items that allow the departments to learn what each organization is bringing to the table and how the resources will be deployed. Remember, some response policies and task procedures may differ; the time to find this out is on the training ground and NOT the fireground.

    Lastly, this aid agreement may provide additional opportunities for the organizations. Plans, policies, and procedures may be improved because of things learned while working together. Maybe you don’t need to purchase a ladder if the automatic aid company is replacing one (use theirs). Offer your rescue comapany and tools to the others, etc.

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Marques Bush

Firefighter Basics launched in February 2009 after Founder/Editor Marques Bush was looking for a way to express himself and share his experiences with brother and sister firefighters. Shortly after founding the site Marques spoke with several trusted friends and ask them to come on board and contribute also. Firefighter Basics is a dedicated group of firefighters who strive everyday to practice what they preach about Training, Safety, and Tradition.  We can be reached at firefighterbasics@gmail.com

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Comments
Aaron
Is This the Dumbing Down of the Fire Service?
As an old school firefighter i have seen the change in our job from gear to hud display on my mask to transmitting 12 leads by wifi to the hospital and its not the drivers or the young firefighters fault for not knowing "the other way" or the dumbing down of the fire service. Its…
2014-10-11 22:43:04
ladderjack
“Go” Versus “No-Go” A Brief Look into Survivability Profiling
Anthony, Thank you for your response. I hope I didn't come off as saying that "I am the only opinion that matters in this paper." I agree with you 100% that there is no "Set" way to do anything, and that we need to keep our minds open to different techniques and thinking outside of…
2014-08-27 20:34:16
Ryan McGovern/ Ladderjack
“Go” Versus “No-Go” A Brief Look into Survivability Profiling
Ben, Thanks a lot for your comment! You're definitely right that there needs to be hoseline protection given to the guys working above the fire; and that a TIC should be utilized when attempting VES techniques. Every little thing we can do and engineer to make an already dangerous maneuver safer is a must! Thanks…
2014-08-27 20:25:20
Anthony Correia
“Go” Versus “No-Go” A Brief Look into Survivability Profiling
While VSP was written as an EFO paper, the paper it is not end all be all on this topic. In a presentation Marsars did last year, he himself said it wasn't 100%. Even gave an example of a fire in his home local where a person lived, that would of met unlikely survivability profiling.…
2014-08-27 19:24:24
Ben Waller
“Go” Versus “No-Go” A Brief Look into Survivability Profiling
...OK, it was 3 points, but who is counting?
2014-08-26 23:44:08

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