What’s in your hosebed?

How often do we think about the line in the hosebed of the engine? The answer for most of us is not enough, unless you are among the lucky Brothers that drop line on the ground on a regular basis. Even if you do, how much attention do you pay to the loads, size of hose carried, forward lay, or reverse lay, or both, what are your options, how will you adapt? Many of us only deal with the hosebed come hose testing or on the occasional job, where maybe a few hundred feet of hose hits the ground.

Drill Time: Get out on the floor, every member must know how much of each hose is carried in that bed. The size, the name of the load your department uses, how to hook a plug, etc. Try setting up a small mock hosebed in the apparatus room, young guys teach the old guys. Our younger members know or should all about repacking hose, they are the newest out of the academy right? Make sure your folks know the difference between an intake and a discharge, seriously, it just might save someone’s behind literally. Learn your hosebed so you take guess work out of this equation. Bosses try this, you might just end up scared. Drivers you should be watching and helping where needed, if you have to ask about your engine, hosebed, or hose carried,maybe you should be on the backstep! Use this to train. Tweek this any way you want, but use it to ensure our professional performance on every tour. Train hard Brothers, be safe!

1 Comment

  • Nate Q. says:

    (2) 750′ of 3′ supply beds flat-loaded (1 bed has wrench/wye, 1 bed has reverse-loaded with dbl female).
    (1) 200′ 2 1/2″ preconnect w/ SB, flatloaded.
    (2) 200′ 1 3/4″ preconnect w/ fog/SB (breakaway), trifold load.
    (1) 150′ 1 1/2″ pack, SB, flat-loaded with wye and 2 1/2″ pony sleeve.
    (1) 100′ 1 3/4″ preconnected trash line, fog/SB, donut rolled.

    Standard op is the first-in wraps the hydrant with dual 3″ lines and lays in. Second-in eng. stops at hydrant, makes connections and pumps to first-in.

    The crew’s got it down, too. However, as we speak, a large quantity of 5″ hose is on its way to our city (thanks AFG). So…I see many training evolutions ahead. Luckily, our Chief has years of experience with the stuff, and has scheduled several weeks of training before it even makes it on the engines. He’s got some pretty solid ideas on lays and supplies, so it should work out in the end.

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