Tactics Tuesday

Use video to practice size-up and discuss your operations. There is no Charlie side view so do the best you can

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Tactics Tuesday, posted with vodpod

8 Comments

  • Nick Morgan says:

    I have to admit I’m biased here, that’s my old hometown, Louisville KY, and first due companies were Engine 22 and Truck 4. I used to ride out with them occasionally. I think they made a good stop. Truck in front of fire building; First attack line went inside; second line to exposure side D, next line went to attck fire on side B as the attic was too well involved to continue a successful interior attack. A back-up line was stretched as well. Looked like sufficient equipment and manpower on scene which included a RIT company. Someone had a tactical worksheet and was keeping track of companies working. I couldn’t see where I would have done anything different. Everyone engaged in fire ground operations was wearing full PPE and SCBA. I have to give a “high five” to the boys in Louisville’s 1st district.

  • HallwaySledge says:

    I think first off we need some map drills for the guy in the buggy and the Tiller crew, since the fan was able to make the wrong turn with the buggy, double-back and still beat the truck in. But that’s something else.

    “On the scene with a single-story bungalow, fire through the roof.”

    Determine if everyone’s out from the bystanders. 360-walk around and see what I can see. Mid-50′s to 60′s construction probably equals rafters and ridge pole so I would feel comfortable going in, at least initially.

    First line and Truck inside, Truck start pulling ceiling. Engine start hitting fire as the attic is opened up.

    Looks like the hydrant was right in front, first-due Engineer should make his own hydrant.

    Second-due Engine, back-up line inside to support the first-due and quick primary.

    Second-due Truck also inside to pull ceiling and assist in the Primary or begin Secondary.

    If it’s me and we are going by what is shown in the video, once those outside lines are opened up I’m pulling the inside companies out.

    Again, if it’s me, those outside lines would have gone onto the roof of the detached garage on the “C” side to hit the fire through the roof and onto the roof of the neighboring house on the “B” side to hit it directly through the gable end rather than from the ground.

    Other than that things will unfold as access to the fire area and the fire dictate. If you can’t get at it you are probably going to be chasing it for a while. If you get in and open the attic space quickly you’ve got a shot at not burning the roof off.

    Agree with Nick, no PPE violations that I could see and what was done was pretty well done and basically strategically sound. I’m just really wary of those outside lines operating while that other line is still inside.

  • Nate Q. says:

    From what I can see in the vid, here’s my take (Assignment of 3 engines, 1 quint, 1 Battalion, 1 ambo. engines/quints staffed with 3):

    First-in engine
    -On scene, 1 story SFD, heavy fire from the Delta gable.
    -Establish command, 360, assess for occupants, FF nozzle to the garage, Ofc joins FF on line.
    -DE takes hydrant near structure.
    -Advance line into garage and open cieling.

    First-in quint (assumes truck role)
    -Ofc/FF assist engine crew with opening up cieling, pull inspection holes in rest of structure while making quick primary, report on fire extension.
    -DE ladder B-side gable, then ladder A-side, then utilities.

    Battalion Officer
    -Assume command.

    Second-in engine
    -Ofc/FF pull back-up line and supplement 1st line.
    -DE pull and man exposure line to D-side.

    Third-in engine
    -Attempt to secure secondary water source if available.
    -Ofc/FF pull and man exposure line to B-side. Make entry to B-exposure to assess.
    -DE make entry to D-exposure and then assist 2nd-in DE with exposure line.

    Ambo
    -Set up rehab, tx/transport of possible pt.’s.

    I’ll echo others’ comments that it appears to be a quickly developing attic fire, and that if interior personnel can’t get a quick handle on it, we’d withdraw to exterior.

    After withdrawal, definitely pull the B gable if no fire from it, and attack from there. May also try cutting access hole in roof just above eaves on A and C-sides and going from there.

    I do have to disagree, though, with the comment that the tiller driver needs map training. They appeared to be the second due truck, and most likely were coming from a distance.

    Anyway, just my take. Appeared to be a pretty good job by the brothers in Louisville.

  • Nate Q. says:

    Sorry for the error in my comment above. I meant that we’d go interior via the front door (A/D corner, and not the “garage” like I typed. Thanks!

  • HallwaySledge says:

    Yeah Nate, good point and a possibility that the Tiller was coming in from a different direction as second-due. Just a little strange that the fan was able to film them passing through the intersection, turn into the same street after they passed and then still beat them in.

  • Nate Q. says:

    Even better point Sledge. I didn’t catch the tiller footage the first time around. Maybe some map drills would be good :)

  • Engine Captain Missouri says:

    Short and sweet, I think it was a good job by the Brothers! Nothing like a stubborn attic job to test your skills. I’m old school, engine guys to engine work, truckies do truck work! Good video for reading smoke for a probie.

  • Nick Morgan says:

    The tiller was Truck 1 and was most likely 2nd due. Truck 4 was in front of the fire building and would have been first in truck with Engine 22 which was hooked up to the hydrant in front of T-4. In Louisville, this fire would either be a 2 engine – 1 truck box with a RIT company assigned; but it also might have been a 3 engine – 2 truck box alarm assignment with one district chief. The medic unit is not a part of the fire dept.

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